Where the USA is — there is sorrow and death.

Russia, Ukraine

“Where the USA–there is sorrow and death.” Don’t shoot the messenger, but just as the message is disturbing, it is also accurate.

Just as unsettling is where the message originated: a prominent Ukrainian website that has long partnered with the West for democratic change in Eastern Europe. It is a turn in attitude which may well represent a sad reality settling in for Ukrainians who had hoped that the West/USA would stand with them in time of trouble.

Top line: “Where the USA–there is sorrow and death.” Sad, but as one who has been all over the world, there has never been a truer statement about my country. We used to be a beacon of hope to the world, but for at least a couple of decades we’ve been running on fumes from the past. We are not a beacon of hope today, and have not been for quite some time. Unfortunately, we still have the power to stir up trouble.

There are five columns, top to bottom, three rows. Column one is Moldova. The USA actively championed Moldova to turn West after the collapse of the USSR, and Moldova did, with a lot of encouragement from the CIA–only to be abandoned by the USA when a larger neighbor (Russia) decided to stop that progress. Those scenes in column one are real.

Column two is Chechnya. When the USSR collapsed, they wanted to be independent again, just like so many other former Soviet republics. They have oil, so of course the USA/CIA got into the mix. Two wars later, several hundred thousand civilians had died and today this Islamic republic is tightly controlled by Moscow. The USA switched sides after “9-11” as we thought that it was in our interest to partner with Putin to fight terrorists. Those scenes are real.

Column three is Dagestan. You likely know Dagestan from the Boston Marathon bombing, as that is where the Tsarnaev brothers were from. Dagestan is another Russian republic that wanted to regain independence from the Soviet demise. The USA quietly encouraged and aided, right up to the 1999 war with Russia. We then just as quietly exited, leaving the Dagestan people to fend for themselves against a vastly superior army. Those scenes are what really happened.

Column four is the country of Georgia. They did manage to leave the USSR, and the USA has been very active in Georgian politics ever since. When Russia decided to teach them a lesson in 2008, we pounded on the table and screamed from the mountaintops–and Georgia is a very mountainous country–but we did nothing when Russia invaded. Yes, those scenes are accurate.

Column five is Ukraine. The current administration, as stupid and useless as previous administrations, sent lots of “help” from the CIA to a parade of US Senators and cabinet officials. McCain and Nuland, damn you both, and please retire and stop running your mouths while pretending to know things that you really don’t. We tapped in to the desire of the Ukrainian people to be free. Apparently we thought that turning Ukraine over to the EU would be a cakewalk. Oops, epic fail.

Both the previous and current administrations pursued the so-called “domino theory” in which we could assist in triggering pro-democracy “spring” movements, and then step back to let the locals succeed in changing things. That doesn’t work too well when locals are left with little more than baseball bats to challenge tanks.

Both the previous and current administrations were/are dominated by naive and largely ignorant wonks, with no idea of what they started. The only difference between the former and the present is the increased effort to aid Islamic movements. Islam at the core is totally non-democratic, and any hope that we can pull such societies out of the 7th century and into modern life, is either grossly naive, or worse, purposeful.

Just like we abandoned the Czechs in 1956 and again in 1968, we rarely finish what we’ve started: Bay of Pigs or Vietnam, anyone? The question that many in the world ask today is: Why bother to stir up and start something that you don’t have the stomach to finish? In case we’ve ruffled a few feathers with this post, please don’t be offended when reminded that given our track record, the world has the right to question our motives…and our resolve.

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Putin Prays for Soldiers

Putin ( Guardian Liberty Voice) Russian president Vladimir Putin took a few minutes during his day last Wednesday to pray for the souls of Russian soldiers who have died in the fighting in Eastern Ukraine. Putin visited Moscow’s Church of the Holy Trinity, a church in the “Sparrow Hills” area of southwest Moscow, in the vicinity of Moscow State University.

Putin was in Moscow to greet former Prime Minister of Japan Yoshiro Mori at the Kremlin. Mori was visiting Moscow while participating in a Russian-Japanese Forum. The Russian leader normally works at the official presidential residence in Novo-Ogaryovo, a Moscow suburb. The Moscow Kremlin is used primarily for state and diplomatic functions.

Putin’s visit to the Sparrow Hills Church was brief, just long enough to light several candles, and say a prayer for the souls of Russian soldiers who had died while fighting in Eastern Ukraine.

Putin told reporters that he lit candles for “those who died defending people in Novorossiya.” The term Novorossiya (Новороссия) means “new Russia” and is a resurrected term from the days of Russian imperialism. Putin has recently hinted that he views Ukraine not as a state, but as a territory of Russia, and some say this means that he believes Ukraine is subject to being reclaimed.

Read the entire article here.

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Tetyana Chornovol Joins Azov Battalion

Ukraine war

In recent weeks we have written about fellow-journalist Tetyana Chornovol, and the death of her husband, Nikolai Berezovoi, who was a commander with the Ukrainian Azov battalion. The Azov unit is a highly dedicated group of skilled volunteers who deeply love their country and are willing to defend Ukraine at all costs.

Tetyana has joined the battalion that her late beloved husband led and she is stationed in Mariupol, where the Azov unit is ready to defend the city in case the cease-fire is violated. We are concerned that the war is not over; and so are asking for well-wishes, thoughts, and prayers for her safety, and the safety of her fellow soldiers.

This war is so senseless and so unnecessary and we also ask our readers to offer the same thoughts and prayers for the young Russian men who are sent to fight (and if you doubt–yes, active Russian troops have been in Ukraine for some time, and are still there).

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Salmon Creamed With Apples

 

We are adding a terrific new recipe to the Mendeleyev Journal culinary pages:

Salmon Creamed With Apples

Ingredients:
Salmon fillets without skin and bones – 600 g Russian Food
Green apples – 2
Onions – 2
Cream – 2 cups
Salt, pepper, cayenne pepper – to taste.

Preparation:
Cut the salmon into fillets.
Apples should be cleaned, then cut in half, cored and cut into slices.
Chop onion into half rings.
Create boat or bowl of foil with high edges – like a small bowl.
Place the fish inside and then position the apple slices between the fillets
Spread the onion evenly
Add salt and pepper
Pour cream over the salmon
Cover with foil
Place on the grill and cook 6-7 minutes until the apple slices are soft

Serve:
Serve with salad.

Russian blogroll sharing

From time to time we come across really good blogs, and most of the time we add them to our blogroll along the right column of this page or to one of the other useful link categories.

Moscow is a big place, the second largest city in Europe, and keeping tabs on everything here is fun, but even more fun when there are other great voices about Russia, Moscow, and Eastern Europe. So in this edition we will share with you a couple of great blogs, run by great bloggers, that might be worthy of a read from time to time.

Russian blogroll

 

If you love food, meet http://www.moscovore.com where editor Jennifer Eremeeva, a veteran expat and committed Moscovore, leads her readers on a journey to find, cook and celebrate great food in Russia’s capital!

 

 

Russian blogroll

Our next blogroll share is at http://www.mustseemoscow.com where you may just learn some shocking facts about Moscow and the Russian culture. What to do, where to go, what to see, what to be careful about, cool places, culture shock…

 

 

We are working on a piece about the ceasefire in Ukraine and hope to have that published soon.

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